An Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods for the by F. Scheinmann

By F. Scheinmann

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The majority of ethyl groups will be found to be similar to the theoretical spectra corresponding to J/ό ~ 015-0-25, although some exhibit A3X2 characteristics (J/δ ~ 0) and one or two are more complex (J/δ > 0-50). Figure 19 shows two experimental spectra illustrating the change of spectrum with the J/δ ratio. (13) NON-EQUIVALENT NUCLEI The *H resonance spectrum of CH 2 F 2 is a simple triplet, and yet the spectrum of CH 2 =CF 2 is considerably more complex due to the fact that the two protons are not magnetically equivalent even though they have the same chemical shift Nuclei which have the same chemical shift and which couple to the same extent with all other nuclei outside the equivalent set, are said to be magnetically equivalent It is an important consequence of an equivalent set that coupling between nuclei within the same set does not affect the spectrum.

A3B2 Spin systems of this type are frequently encountered in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, since virtually all ethyl groups come under this classification. Figure 18 shows the various spectra that may be obtained for several values of J/δ. The majority of ethyl groups will be found to be similar to the theoretical spectra corresponding to J/ό ~ 015-0-25, although some exhibit A3X2 characteristics (J/δ ~ 0) and one or two are more complex (J/δ > 0-50). Figure 19 shows two experimental spectra illustrating the change of spectrum with the J/δ ratio.

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